Grades

Offering services to students in grades 8-12

Early Start For Great Success

Many parents and students are losing sleep, feeling overwhelmed and are starving or over-feeding themselves due to the stress of planning their futures. This is why we believe starting as early as possible helps spread the stress over time making it a much easier process. We offer personalized next step programs and services for students starting in the 8th grade through 12th grade. 

multicultural classmates with backpacks running along school corridor

Eighth Grade

A strong start impacts the overall high school experience. The Fearless Fresh Start Program focuses on the courage it takes to start high school strong. We focus on: 

  • Testing: Put forth your best effort and demonstrate your level of academic excellence. 
  • Test-Out-Program: Demonstrate your background knowledge and challenge a freshmen class. 
  • Challenge Curriculum: Take classes that will encourage you to think and improve your academic ability. 
  • Interest Inventory: Begin to discover your personal preferences and learning style. 
  • Read: Increase reading material across genres, including informational texts. 
multicultural classmates with backpacks running along school corridor

Eighth Grade

A strong start impacts the overall high school experience. The Fearless Fresh Start Program focuses on the courage it takes to start high school strong. We focus on: 

  • Testing: Put forth your best effort and demonstrate your level of academic excellence. 
  • Test-Out-Program: Demonstrate your background knowledge and challenge a freshmen class. 
  • Challenge Curriculum: Take classes that will allow you to think and improve your academic ability. 
  • Interest Inventory: Begin to discover your personal preferences and learning style. 
  • Read: Increase reading material across genres, including informational texts. 
two happy female college or high students on green wooden background

Ninth Grade

Get organized, recognize different ways of learning, get involved and discover like-minded friends. Continuing from the 8th grade steps, we focus on:

  • Student Responsibility: Attend school on time, work hard in class and earn credits towards graduation.
  • PSAT Exam: A test just for the student! Use this test to identify current strengths and weaknesses. With practice, students may take the PSAT as a junior and compete for college scholarship funds through the National Merit Scholarship Corporation and participating colleges.
  • Personal Learning Plan: Create a plan that guides you toward a post-secondary goal. Keep it active by reviewing and editing it prior to each class registration period.
  • English Acceleration: Like to read? Learn English skills as they relate to literature in Advanced English classes.
  • Foreign Language: Most colleges outside of South Dakota expect at least 2 years of the same language (some require 3 years; competitive colleges may require 4 years)
  • Exploration: Get a liberal arts type education by taking classes in academic and personal interest areas.
  • Competitive Academic Teams: Join academic teams to display your academic excellence while winning honors and awards.
  • Clubs, Organizations, & Sports: High school offers many opportunities for students to participate in and to build school spirit, while creating memories and discovering friends with similar interests.
  • Read: Include historical and current events.
two happy female college or high students on green wooden background

Ninth Grade

Get organized, recognize different ways of learning, get involved and discover like-minded friends. Continuing from the 8th grade steps, we focus on:

  • Student Responsibility: Attend school on time, work hard in class and earn your credits towards graduation. 
  • PSAT Exam: A test just for the student! Use this test to identify current strengths and weaknesses. With practice, students may take the PSAT as a junior and compete for college scholarship funds through the National Merit Scholarship Corporation and participating colleges.
  • Personal Learning Plan: Create a plan that guides you toward a post-secondary goal. Keep it active by reviewing and editing it prior to each class registration period. 
  • English Acceleration: Like to read? Learn English skills as they relate to literature in Advanced English classes. 
  • Foreign Language: Most colleges outside of South Dakota expect at least 2 years of the same language (some require 3 years; competitive colleges may require 4 years) 
  • Exploration: Get a liberal arts type education by taking classes in academic and personal interest areas. 
  • Competitive Academic Teams: Join academic teams to display your academic excellence while winning honors and awards. 
  • Clubs, Organizations, & Sports: High school offers many opportunities for students to participate in and to build school spirit, while creating memories and discovering friends with similar interests.
  • Read: Include historical and current events. 
two female high school students at a sports game

Tenth Grade

Reflect on personal experiences, and then identify abilities and passions that can be connected to right-fit future school and job prospects. Continuing from the 9th grade steps, we focus on:

  • Subject Acceleration: Identify academic strengths and enhance learning through additional classes in that area or acceleration toward college courses. 
  • Online Classes: Opportunities for classes not offered in high school are available; some require a fee.
  • Career Exploration: Begin the search for a potential career by matching academic skill with personal preferences. Research career educational requirements and potential earnings. 
  • Youth Internships: Explore careers through job shadowing. 
  • Take Initiative: Offer assistance to teachers and peers. Think of ways to improve the high school experience for other students.
  • Advanced Placement (AP) Program: Take college-level courses taught in high school and earn college credit by taking the AP exam in the spring and meeting the AP policy at a chosen college. Students can prepare for college course expectations, the demands of collegiate work ethic, and time management. 
two female high school students at a sports game

Tenth Grade

Reflect on personal experiences, and then identify abilities and passions that can be connected to right-fit future school and job prospects. Continuing from the 9th grade steps, we focus on:

  • Subject Acceleration: Identify academic strengths and enhance learning through additional classes in that area or acceleration toward college courses. 
  • Online Classes: Opportunities for classes not offered in high school are available; some require a fee.
  • Career Exploration: Begin the search for a potential career by matching academic skill with personal preferences. Research career educational requirements and potential earnings. 
  • Youth Internships: Explore careers through job shadowing. 
  • Take Initiative: Offer assistance to teachers and peers. Think of ways to improve the high school experience for other students.
  • Advanced Placement (AP) Program: Take college-level courses taught in high school and earn college credit by taking the AP exam in the spring and meeting the AP policy at a chosen college. Students can prepare for college course expectations, the demands of collegiate work ethic, and time management. 
teenage girl sitting in front of a yellow wall and red base

Eleventh Grade

Live out, practice and improve academic and personal skills. It is time to become familiar with the clear, practical college selection process. Continuing from the 10th grade steps, we focus on:

  • End-Of-Year Performance: The end-of-year GPA and rank are used and weighed heavily in college applications. 
  • Major and College Search: Begin serious college considerations- define preferences, gather application information, scholarships, qualifying ACT/SAT test scores, and essay topics. 
  • Scholarship Services: Register to receive high school scholarship information emails. START EARLY. 
  • AP Program: Take challenging AP courses in areas of strength. The curriculum experience will prepare students for college classes. The AP Exam cost and credit save time and money toward college. Study in class and out-of-class to score well on exams. 
  • Dual Enrollment: Take college courses based on ability. Families are responsible for any costs. 
  • Senate Youth Program: Interested in politics? Serve as a senate page. 
  • Boys and Girls State: Participate in the civic experience of city, state, and national government. 
  • PSAT (Preliminary SAT): Junior scores are entered in the National Merit Scholarship Competition. Earn a high score to be a Commended Student or National Merit Semifinalists and potentially earn substantial scholarship funds. The National Scholarship Service offers services to African American/Black students and The National Hispanic Recognition Program services Hispanic/Latino students. The Telluride Association offers humanities and social science scholarships for summer seminars. Check College Board for more recognitions. 
  • ACT/SAT Exams: College entrance exams. Begin preparing and taking practice exams. Search college websites for application acceptance and scholarship qualifying test scores.
teenage girl sitting in front of a yellow wall and red base

Eleventh Grade

Live out, practice and improve academic and personal skills. It is time to become familiar with the clear, practical college selection process. Continuing from the 10th grade steps, we focus on:

  • End-Of-Year Performance: The end-of-year GPA and rank are used and weighed heavily in college applications. 
  • Major and College Search: Begin serious college considerations- define preferences, gather application information, scholarships, qualifying ACT/SAT test scores, and essay topics. 
  • Scholarship Services: Register to receive high school scholarship information emails. START EARLY. 
  • AP Program: Take challenging AP courses in areas of strength. The curriculum experience will prepare students for college classes. The AP Exam cost and credit save time and money toward college. Study in class and out-of-class to score well on exams. 
  • Dual Enrollment: Take college courses based on ability. Families are responsible for any costs.
  • Senate Youth Program: Interested in politics? Serve as a senate page. 
  • Boys and Girls State: Participate in the civic experience of city, state, and national government. 
  • PSAT (Preliminary SAT): Junior scores are entered in the National Merit Scholarship Competition. Earn a high score to be a Commended Student or National Merit Semifinalists and potentially earn substantial scholarship funds. The National Scholarship Service offers services to African American/Black students and The National Hispanic Recognition Program services Hispanic/Latino students. The Telluride Association offers humanities and social science scholarships for summer seminars. Check College Board for more recognitions. 
  • ACT/SAT Exams: College entrance exams. Begin preparing and taking practice exams. Search college websites for application acceptance and scholarship qualifying test scores. 
senior graduation wallpaper

Twelfth Grade

Seniors may become complacent about school or worry about what happens after graduation. However, having a strong academic plan can improve confidence to finalize, enjoy and protect a hard-earned high school legacy. Important: Colleges expect students to continue to excel throughout their senior year.  Continuing from the 11th grade steps, we focus on:

  • Student Responsibility: Continue to strive for excellence and encourage your peers to do their best.
  • College Applications: Begin the process early and start communicating with choice colleges. Visit them, if possible. 
  • AP Program: Continue taking AP courses in areas of strength.
  • Dual Enrollment: Earn college credit while still in high school. 
  • Presidential Scholar: Exceptional ACT/SAT Exam scores are needed to become a Presidential Scholar and compete for a trip to Washington, DC.
senior graduation wallpaper

Twelfth Grade

Seniors may become complacent about school or worry about what happens after graduation. However, having a strong academic plan can improve confidence to finalize, enjoy and protect a hard-earned high school legacy. Important: Colleges expect students to continue to excel throughout their senior year.  Continuing from the 11th grade steps, we focus on:

  • Student Responsibility: Continue to strive for excellence and encourage your peers to do their best.
  • College Applications: Begin the process early and start communicating with choice colleges. Visit them, if possible. 
  • AP Program: Continue taking AP courses in areas of strength.
  • Dual Enrollment: Earn college credit while still in high school. 
  • Presidential Scholar: Exceptional ACT/SAT Exam scores are needed to become a Presidential Scholar and compete for a trip to Washington, DC.